BMW Motorrad’s scooter designs

The BMW E-Scooter is a concept two-wheel vehicle with electric drive designed for mainly urban driving. With a 100km driving range, and only three hours to charge the battery on any regular household power socket, the scooter aims to be more versatile than many of the other electric scooters on the market.

The E-Scooter is one of the latest conceptual two-wheel urban mobility ideas to be developed at BMW Motorrad, a branch of the German marque dedicated to making individual single-track vehicles – as in motorbikes and scooters.

The E-Scooter doesn’t have a main frame. Instead, the aluminium battery casing, which also contains the electronic system required for battery cell monitoring, takes over the function of the frame. The steering head support is connected to it, as is the rear frame and the left-hand mounted single swing arm with directly hinged, horizontally installed shock absorber.

BMW Motorrad has also recently released the C 600 Sport and the C 650 GT premium maxi scooters available in the spring. The C 600 Sport is targeted at riders with sports ambitions, the C 650 GT is for customers who seek comfort and touring ability.

The C 600 has sporty, spartan panels – the lean tail with the dynamic upswing and emphatic body edges lends the vehicle a little lightness. The C 650 GT relies on a more organic design language. The emphasis here is on comfort with the generously sized panel parts offering protection against wind and weather.

The German carmaker recently announced a new design director, Edgar Heinrich, and hopes to expand the activities of BMW Motorrad further to look into other innovative urban mobility solutions.

Design Talks | 5 – 25 Scrutton Street | Old Street | Shoreditch | London | EC2A 4HJ?W | UK | www.d-talks.com | Bookshop www.d-talks.com/bookshop | Published by Banksthomas

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