Beetle inspires James Dyson winner

A device that extracts water from thin air as a solution to the draught problem has won the 2011 James Dyson Award. Airdrop, designed by Edward Linacre, is a low cost, self powered, and easy to install solution to the problems of growing crops in arid regions. Linacre has been inspired by Australia’s worst drought in a century. The student, from Swinburne University of Technology in Melbourne, turned to nature to find ways of capturing moisture... Read More

Room divider wins James Dyson Award

A portable, retractable room divider has won the UK leg of the James Dyson Award. Designed by Michael Korn, KwickScreen helps healthcare professionals make the best use of their often limited available space – allowing for more privacy, dignity and protection to patients. The student at London’s Royal College of Art has explored the use bistable materials such as slap on bracelets and tape measures. He developed early prototypes drawing on... Read More

James Dyson challenges young design engineers

Industrial designer James Dyson is challenging young designers and engineers to come up with problem-solving inventions – much like he did with the innovative bagless Dyson vacuum cleaner back in the 1980s – as part of the James Dyson Award. The competition is open for entries and deadline for submission is 2 August 2011. Those interested should  submit a footage, images and sketches along with a synopsis detailing the design process... Read More

Dyson encourages design engineering

The UK government has just announced its five ‘golden’ subjects for the education curriculum. Sadly engineering doesn’t feature in this. The reality is that the country is suffering from a lack of trained engineers. The figures are quite shocking: the UK produces only 24,000 engineering graduates a year, compared to around 300,000 in China and 450,000 in India. Students in this field are often lured to work in the finance sector with... Read More